Popular History of London William H. Rideing

ISBN:

Published:

Kindle Edition

510 pages


Description

Popular History of London  by  William H. Rideing

Popular History of London by William H. Rideing
| Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, RTF | 510 pages | ISBN: | 3.50 Mb

This illustrated volume was published in 1894.Excerpts:Roman London was the real beginning of the great city,and a part of it lies buried eighteen feet below the level ofCheapside. The Romans left deep footprints wherever theytrod, and many of theMoreThis illustrated volume was published in 1894.Excerpts:Roman London was the real beginning of the great city,and a part of it lies buried eighteen feet below the level ofCheapside.

The Romans left deep footprints wherever theytrod, and many of the existing streets follow the lines whichthey beat out. The river bank was the site of their palaces,and a stone imbedded in the walls of one of the churchesmarks the starting-point of the roads which they designed.In a lane out of the Strand may still be seen a deep, cool bathin which they bathed after the chariot races at Finsbury.Fragments of the pavements trodden by Hadrian and Con-stantine are occasionally unearthed, and the ramparts whichthe legionaries guarded have not yet wholly crumbled todust...................................................................................The fate of Thomas a Becket is one of the saddest storiesof English history.

This young Londoner became the mostintimate friend of Henry II. - he and the king were nearlyof an age, and it was said of them that they had but oneheart and one mind - they even romped in the streets, andwere as two brothers. The king loaded his favorite withriches and honors, and made him chancellor of the realm.......................................................................................In Bread Street every good house is an inn, each with itssign either swinging overhead, or blazoned on its secondstory, or stuck daintily over its main door.

One called theMermaid is the meeting place of a club, and that gentlemanin the trunk hose, with meditative air, dreamy eyes, andpointed chin, is Sir Walter Raleigh, entering to make inquiriesafter Shakespeare and Fletcher. To-night, or, possibly, to-morrow night, there will be a goodly company around thesquare inn table, sitting on plain wooden chairs, and talkingwisely and wittily.St. Pauls is not far away, and a wonderful sight the interiorpresents. Hundreds of people are parading up and down intheir grand costumes, rattling their velvet-cased and gold-tipped rapiers, tossing their feathered hats, throwing backtheir laced cloaks to show their huge gold chains, shakingtheir beards, toying with their love -locks, whispering, swear-ing, hiring servants ( I bought him in St.

Pauls, says Fal-staff of Bardolph), talking of the new play and the lastpamphlet, the exploits of Drake, the whims of Philip of Spain....................................................................................Still in the company of Scott let us now walk from TempleBar in the direction of Westminster. Temple Bar was not,in the time of James I., the arched screen or gateway of thepresent century - but an open railing, or palisade, which, atnight, and in times of alarm, was closed with a barricade ofposts and chains.

The Strand, also, was not, as now, a con-tinued street, although it was beginning already to assumethat character. It still might be considered as an open road,along the south side of which stood various houses and hotelsbelonging to the nobility, having gardens behind them downto the water side, with stairs to the river, for the convenienceof taking boat, which mansions have bequeathed the namesof their lordly owners to many of the streets leading from theStrand to the Thames.....................................................................



Enter the sum





Related Archive Books



Related Books


Comments

Comments for "Popular History of London":


haarkapsels.eu

©2013-2015 | DMCA | Contact us